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Hosted by Smita Jamdar who is joined by our education and legal specialists, Going Further And Higher offers you a deeper understanding of the current key topics influencing the education sector.In each episode, Smita will discuss topical issues impacting the further and higher education sector, aiming to spark debate, engage and inspire those working in the sector.With a long-standing involvement in and commitment to the education sector, Shakespeare Martineau's education team have extensiv ...
 
If you're a future focused Higher Education Professional, a University Executive, or an Entrepreneurial Educator committed to the long haul of Higher Education, then this show is for you! Join your host Tony D'Angelo, the founder of Collegiate Empowerment, as he and his guests help you increase your professional Clarity, Confidence, Capability and Commitment, so you can Help College Students Get What They Truly Want and Need for success in the 21st Century. From Enrollment through Engagement ...
 
Leading Improvements in Higher Education with Stephen Hundley from IUPUI is an award-winning podcast service of the Assessment Institute in Indianapolis (assessmentinstitute.iupui.edu), the oldest and largest higher education assessment and improvement event in the U.S. The podcast profiles people, initiatives, institutions, and organizations improving conditions in higher education. Join thought leaders for engaging discussions of enduring and emerging topics, themes, and trends affecting c ...
 
PeopleAdmin is the leading provider of cloud-based talent management solutions for education and government. Its software enables customers to streamline the hiring process, onboard new employees, efficiently manage positions and employee performance, develop compliant and defensible audit trails, and utilize industry-leading reporting and data-driven predictive analytics.
 
HECAOD podcasts feature voices from the field including prevention and recovery professionals, students, researchers, policy makers and parents. Our goal is to provide lively discussions on current topics that motivate innovation, inspire action and advance the field of AOD misuse prevention and collegiate recovery.
 
Today’s college-bound students have many questions. Many parents don’t understand how much has changed since their college years. The process is even different with every child. Guidance counselors also have a hard time keeping up with post-COVID industry changes. It’s why we have launched the Higher Ed Higher Purpose podcast. It will enlighten, empower and inspire so you can be confident in the search journey to find the best fit for your student.
 
Enrollment Growth University is a professional development podcast for higher education leaders looking to grow enrollment at their college or university.Each episode features an interview with a leader in higher education, discussing enrollment growth strategies that are working at their institution, through topics suchas: enrollment marketing, adult student recruitment, enrollment management, online learning, student retention, data intelligence, online course development, financial aid, a ...
 
Solutions for Higher Education dives into hot topics in the world of colleges and universities. Sometimes it tackles controversies in education, sometimes it looks at current events, sometimes it's innovations and fun. Brought to you by Southern Utah University, but geared toward anyone with an interest in the subjects, episodes are hosted by SUU's President Scott L Wyatt and Professor Steve Meredith.
 
Research in Action is a weekly podcast about topics and issues related to research in higher education from experts across a range of disciplines.
 
School Sucks is a podcast, You Tube channel, and web community empowering parents and self-directed learners. For 12 years we've promoted freedom in education, and we've called out covert indoctrination. We discuss: + educational alternatives like homeschooling and unschooling + career freedom without college + the principles of self-directed learning + the strategies of critical thinking/information literacy + the rewards of self-knowledge/personal development This is NOT a show about schoo ...
 
Defining Our Roots/Routes: Asian American in Higher Education serves to amplify the erased voices of Asian American students and faculty in higher education as a form of resistance and consciousness-raising by exploring interrelated themes—histories and legacies of Asian America, pan-Asian American identity, queering Asian America, and Asian American transnationalism & diaspora. Join us for insights into the lived experiences of Asian American students and scholars in higher education spaces ...
 
Good School, it’s not just a phrase. It defines who we are. It determines our future success. It determines our social network, and it determines our social mobility. Join the students of the Community College of Baltimore County as they explore the concept of a “good school” in this ongoing podcast series. Season 1 launching December 2022! Subscribe now to be notified when our first episode drops.
 
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Jesuit Colleges and Universities in the United States: A History (Catholic University of America Press, 2022) provides a comprehensive history of Jesuit higher education in the United States, weaving together the stories of the fifty-four colleges and universities that the Jesuits have operated (successfully and unsuccessfully) since 1789. It empha…
 
A career in academia comes with a lot of components – some good and some not so good. In this episode we’re talking about topics that might seem like their on the periphery of the core elements of an academic career, but they’re crucial to your credibility among colleagues and your sense of well-being. Ray Crossman, president of Adler University in…
 
This episode features a leadership perspectives conversation with Amelia Parnell, Vice President for Policy Research and Advocacy at NASPA, a U.S. association devoted to serving student affairs administrators in higher education. Some of the resources mentioned in this episode include the following: NASPA (association): https://naspa.org/ You Are a…
 
In this episode, Smita Jamdar is joined by Andrew Adams, Litigation Partner, to further explore the freedom of speech on campus, specifically enforcing the rights on disgruntled students and staff, both by the current legislative framework and the higher education freedom of speech bill. Find out more or get in contact with our education team here.…
 
Why do PhD programs assume students will become professors, when most people find careers outside academia? How can we better prepare graduate students for the post-grad career path? This episode explores: What a “Connected PhD” program is, and why it’s necessary. The negative impact on students when they feel "less than" or as if they have failed …
 
Donna Riley, professor and head of the school of engineering education at Purdue University, talks about her path, her work, and her 2008 book, Engineering and Social Justice, with Peoples & Things host, Lee Vinsel. If technologies and infrastructures embody moral and political values, what should engineering students be taught about their roles in…
 
These are troubling days for the humanities. In response, a recent proliferation of works defending the humanities has emerged. But, taken together, what are these works really saying, and how persuasive do they prove? The Battle of the Classics: How a Nineteenth-Century Debate Can Save the Humanities Today (Oxford UP, 2020) demonstrates the crucia…
 
Davarian L. Baldwin is a professor of American studies and founding director of the Smart Cities Lab at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn. His latest book, In the Shadow of the Ivory Tower: How Universities Are Plundering Our Cities (Bold Type Books, 2021) is a wake-up call to the reality that higher education is no longer the ubiquitous public goo…
 
Many histories of science have been written, but A New History of the Humanities (Oxford UP, 2014) offers the first overarching history of the humanities from Antiquity to the present. There are already historical studies of musicology, logic, art history, linguistics, and historiography, but this volume gathers these, and many other humanities dis…
 
All Souls College Oxford was one of the meeting points of English public intellectuals in the twentieth century. Its Fellows prided themselves on agreeing in everything except their opinions. They included Cabinet Ministers from all the three major parties, and academics of diverse political allegiances, who met for frank conversations and lively d…
 
This episode is a recording of a short paper presented by Kim and Saronik in the panel “Literary Criticism: New Platforms” organized by Anna Kornbluh at the 2023 Convention of the Modern Language Association. In the paper, they reflect on the nature of the voice in the humanities and the role of the humanities podcast inside and outside institution…
 
This episode is a roundtable discussion on the influence of the neoliberal project on higher education. Our guests are Professor Emeritus Frank Fear from Michigan State University, Professor Claire Polster from the University of Regina, and Professor Ruben Martinez from Michigan State University. The conversation is wide-ranging across topics such …
 
Roosevelt Montás is Senior Lecturer in American Studies and English at Columbia University. A specialist in Antebellum American literature and culture and in American citizenship, he focuses mainly on the history, meaning, and future of liberal education. This question motivates his book Rescuing Socrates: How the Great Books Changed My Life and Wh…
 
Why did thousands of workers at prestigious universities in the United States go on strike in 2022? How did we get to this historic moment, and is it really over? This episode explores: The myriad ways universities can wield power over workers and even their families. Why university workers are divided into different unions—and why some have no uni…
 
In April 2006, The Institute held a two day symposium about copyright and intellectual property, titled Comedies of Fair Use. In this session, Lewis Hyde talks about owning art and ideas. Hyde is a cultural critic and scholar, whose work focuses on the nature of imagination, creativity, and property. He is best known for his books, The Gift: Imagin…
 
Inspired by Bradley Sommer’s tweet this past summer about the ongoing challenges of the Humanities job market in the U.S., this four part podcast (produced by Erica Bennett, an M.A. student in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Alabama) talks with an early career scholar now looking for work in academia, a senior scholar with …
 
Inspired by Bradley Sommer’s tweet this past summer about the ongoing challenges of the Humanities job market in the U.S., this four part podcast (produced by Erica Bennett, an M.A. student in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Alabama) talks with an early career scholar now looking for work in academia, a senior scholar with …
 
The marginalisation of Black voices from the academy is a problem in the Western world. But Black Studies, where it exists, is a powerful, boundary-pushing discipline, grown out of struggle and community action. In The Future of Black Studies (Pluto Press, 2022), Abdul Alkalimat, one of the founders of Black Studies in the US, presents a reimaginin…
 
Inspired by Bradley Sommer’s tweet this past summer about the ongoing challenges of the Humanities job market in the U.S., this four part podcast (produced by Erica Bennett, an M.A. student in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Alabama) talks with an early career scholar now looking for work in academia, a senior scholar with …
 
Inspired by Bradley Sommer’s tweet this past summer about the ongoing challenges of the Humanities job market in the U.S., this four part podcast (produced by Erica Bennett, an M.A. student in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Alabama) talks with an early career scholar now looking for work in academia, a senior scholar with …
 
Green Academia: Towards Eco-Friendly Education Systems (Routledge, 2022) can be read as a systemic long-term counter-intervention strategy against any form of impending pandemics in the post-COVID era and beyond. It argues that anti-nature and capitalistic knowledge systems have contributed to the evolution and growth of COVID-19 across the globe a…
 
Can the study of religion be justified? Scholarship in religion, especially work in "theory and method," is preoccupied with matters of research procedure and thus inarticulate about the goals that motivate scholarship in the field. For that reason, the field suffers from a crisis of rationale. Richard B. Miller identifies six prevailing methodolog…
 
How far did post-UNTAC Cambodia exemplified an expanded Habermasian public sphere? What happened when a range of aid agencies, private donors, activists and academics showed up with all sorts of competing agendas for educational and cultural projects? In conversation with Duncan McCargo, former Center for Khmer Studies director Philippe Peycam disc…
 
Episode 1: Histories and Legacies of Asian Americans in Higher Education explores how Asian American faculty, students, and scholars are actively mobilizing and giving voice to their past and current struggles on campus and beyond. They discuss the real-life impacts of stereotypes such as the model minority myth and articulate their thoughts on wha…
 
In this episode, we discuss the role the Department Chair plays in higher education institutions with representatives from the Wiley publication entitled The Department Chair. Our guests are Carolyn Allard, Trey Guinn, Juston Pate, and Halley Sutton. Carolyn is Editor of The Department Chair; Trey is Associate Professor and Program Director in the …
 
According to data from the Community College Research Center (CCRC), two-year institutions lose about 45% of students within their first year. How can colleges reimagine students’ first year of college in a way that centers on students exploring and entering a program of study? Join us as Dr. Hana Lahr of CCRC shares her research on whole-college g…
 
Beth Hillman discusses the recent merger between Mills College and Northeastern University. Hillman, who served as President of Mills from 2016-22, describes the many strategies that the Oakland, CA-based women’s college attempted before moving forward with the merger, including a potential strategic partnership with its neighbor, UC Berkeley. She …
 
When a professor is not who they say they are, what does it take to get them to resign? This episode explores: How an anonymous twitter account and a media investigation helped Ms. Cyca reveal the truth about a professor misrepresenting their identity. Why professors can fail to fully acknowledge all the harm done to the students, staff, and commun…
 
Universities have been around for a millennium, however their modern iteration - and the people who lead them - are somewhat different to their medieval European ancestors. Over the centuries, institutions have dealt with a multitude of difficulties but the current combination of a global pandemic, economic downturn, populist politics and a climate…
 
Games can act as invaluable tools for the teaching of the Middle Ages. The learning potential of physical and digital games is increasingly undeniable at every level of historical study. These games can provide a foundation of information through their stories and worlds. They can foster understanding of complex systems through their mechanics and …
 
It didn't always take thirty years to pay off the cost of a bachelor's degree. In Indentured Students: How Government-Guaranteed Loans Left Generations Drowning in College Debt (Harvard UP, 2021), Elizabeth Tandy Shermer untangles the history that brought us here and discovers that the story of skyrocketing college debt is not merely one of good in…
 
Decolonizing 1968: Transnational Student Activism in Tunis, Paris, and Dakar (Cornell UP, 2022) explores how activists in 1968 transformed university campuses across Europe and North Africa into sites of contestation where students, administrators, and state officials collided over definitions of modernity and nationhood after empire. Burleigh Hend…
 
We all know that academic integrity matters. But do we all agree on what academic integrity really is? Somewhere beyond the nuances and gray areas is blatant cheating. And that’s always wrong . . . but what if your professor asks you to cheat? This episode explores: How well students understand academic integrity. Why Dr. Heng Hartse designed a cou…
 
Russell McCutcheon shares his views on the academic study of religion, and the path ahead for religion graduates and the field itself. McCutcheon is a professor of religious studies at the University of Alabama and a contributor to the Religious Studies Project podcast. Raj Balkaran is a scholar of Sanskrit narrative texts. He teaches at the Oxford…
 
Ruth Simmons was the first African American president of Brown University which she led for 11 years. Before that she was president at Smith College where she set up the first engineering programme at a women’s institution. She was recently called out of retirement to lead Prairie View A&M an historically black institution in southeast Texas. As sh…
 
Medical science in antebellum America was organized around a paradox: it presumed African Americans to be less than human yet still human enough to be viable as experimental subjects, as cadavers, and for use in the training of medical students. By taking a hard look at the racial ideas of both northern and southern medical schools, Christopher D. …
 
“I’m burned out” is a familiar phrase in higher ed these days. This episode explores: What burnout is and is not. One scholar’s personal experience with burnout. How higher ed’s culture and the “expectation escalation” encourage burnout. Academic capitalism and its relationship to faculty burnout. The missing voices from the conversation on burnout…
 
How can faculty and staff address the real issues, however forbidden, that make students feel isolated and voiceless? When teams research difficult topics, how can they establish two-way, equitable participation with their community? Members of the teams that won the Times Higher Education 2021 Awards for Outstanding Contribution to the Local Commu…
 
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