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New Sounds is unlike any radio show you've ever heard: a whirlwind tour of new and unusual music from all corners of the globe. New Sounds combs recent recordings for one of the most informative and compelling hours on radio, and aims to make the world smaller. For over 25 years, host John Schaefer has been finding the melody in the rainforest and the rhythm in an orchestra of tin cans. Defying rigid categorization and genre pigeonholing, New Sounds offers new ways to hear the ancient langua ...
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Community Boards can be where ideas to improve the local area are born. The volunteers who serve on them must be approved by each borough president, and get to meet directly with city agencies to draw attention to each neighborhood's needs and recommend changes. Bronx Borough President Vanessa Gibson joined WNYC's Morning Edition host Michael Hill …
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The Adams administration is expanding its program to deliver free meals to older adults at home, citing a post-pandemic rise in isolation and decreased mobility among the city’s oldest New Yorkers. In addition to weekday meals, city-funded home meal services will include deliveries on holidays and require halal options starting in July, according t…
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The bookstore scene isn't what it used to be, but New York City is still home to some neighborhood gems. This Black History Month, WNYC's Community Partnerships Desk is circulating the stories of Black-owned bookstores in our region. Darlene Okpo opened Adanne Bookstore in 2021 in Dumbo, Brooklyn. The shop has since moved to a new location in Bed-S…
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Most bookshops have a food section, but a pair of Brooklyn sisters are stocking their entire store with food-related titles. This Black History Month, WNYC's Community Partnerships Desk is highlighting Black-owned bookstores in our area. BEM | books & more is an online and pop-up bookstore created by sisters Danielle and Gabrielle Davenport in Janu…
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In her bid for the U.S. Senate, N.J. First Lady Tammy Murphy has huge advantages. But she is behind Rep. Andy Kim in a recent poll, and has lost the first three county conventions where Democrats vote to give out endorsements. Murphy has alliances throughout New Jersey's Democratic Party leadership, and endorsements from several powerful influences…
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Doctors and parents continue to sound the alarm on teens and kids struggling with mental health, in what's been described as a nationwide crisis. In New York City, efforts have focused specifically on connecting Asian American kids and teens with mental health resources, as statistics put them at an especially high risk of suicide or self harm. Dr.…
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Many New Jersey towns entirely bar “accessory dwelling units,” or ADUs — secondary apartments that are on the same lot as a main home, sometimes attached to the house. Other towns allow them, but only if the occupant is related to the main home's residents, or older than a certain age. But new proposed state legislation would require all towns stat…
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The death of Flaco, the Eurasian eagle owl who escaped the Central Park Zoo last year, has devastated New York City's birding community. The Wildlife Conservation Society reported that Flaco appeared to have collided with a building on West 89th Street. And it has raised questions, once again, about what we can do to try to make New York City a saf…
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This weekend, a figure ice skating team from Howard University will make history as the first team from an HBCU to take part in an intercollegiate competition. New Yorker Cheyenne Walker is one of the two founders of the club. She learned the skill through Figure Skating in Harlem, an organization dedicated to helping girls of color learn to skate.…
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New York's Department of State is stepping up enforcement against housing discrimination on Long Island. It has recently punished real estate agents in Nassau and Suffolk counties for violating fair housing standards. Many of the agents were discovered in the course of a 3-year-long undercover investigation by Newsday, which found widespread unequa…
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Overflowing garbage cans and debris-filled pathways are familiar sights for visitors to Claremont Park in the Bronx — but the parks department has limited money to clean things up. The 38-acre park sits atop a hill in one of the city’s poorest neighborhoods, and has to compete for $29 million allocated this year for the maintenance and operations o…
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New York's City Council says it's joining a lawsuit against Mayor Adams over his decision to block new laws expanding access to rental assistance vouchers to more low-income residents. The Council is intervening in a suit filed by the Legal Aid Society earlier this month that seeks to make more New Yorkers eligible for the CityFHEPS voucher program…
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Soap gets laundry done. Conversation gets democracy going. This election year, WNYC is turning some laundromats in the New York metro area into hubs of civic dialogue. Let’s talk democracy at the laundromat! We'll be regularly talking to neighborhood residents at: Stuy Wash N Dry in East New York, Brooklyn14th Street Laundry in Astoria, QueensMadis…
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Who filed more than a dozen complaints with New York City’s buildings department against the venerated Greenpoint bar and metal music venue Saint Vitus?That’s the burning question swirling within the city’s metal music scene after the venue closed on Friday due to building violations, which include a certificate of occupancy that doesn’t match a ba…
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Medical respite care has so far been limited in New York, but it’s on the verge of expanding. The programs provide temporary housing and services like wound care, physical therapy and social services to homeless hospital patients, while freeing up beds for others. Respite providers also aim to connect patients with stable, long-term housing as they…
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A new report finds construction deaths are trending up in New York City for the third year in a row, even as they decrease statewide. The nonprofit New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health says 24 construction workers died in the city in 2022, the last year for which data is available. That's compared to 20 in 2021, and 13 in 2020. Cha…
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There's a script for the way things usually go in New Jersey. And then there's the primary for the U.S. senate seat currently occupied by Bob Menendez. He's facing federal bribery charges and hasn't declared whether he will run. Some political observers say the battle to replace him could upend the way politics works in New Jersey. At the very leas…
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The WNYC Public Song Project is back for a second year in a row! Listeners with a knack for creativity can send in a song based on a work of music, literature, or film currently in the public domain. The team at "All of It" this year wants listeners to focus on the 1920s — a nod to WNYC's 2024 centennial celebration. For the first time, submissions…
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A new book from sociologist Terry Williams details the lives of people who lived in tunnels underneath New York City. Williams has studied the city and its subcultures for more than 40 years, publishing books on subjects including street hustlers, after-hours clubs and building superintendents in Harlem. To research “Life Underground: Encounters wi…
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Josh Tierney moved to New York City when he was 17, and first crashed in a studio apartment in Jamaica, Queens, with a lesbian couple and their beagle. He spent his first year commuting back to Long Island to finish high school. He found his current apartment on Craiglist in 2008 after bouncing around various sublets and living situations. He’d act…
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When the film and TV industry returned to work last fall, so did New York City-based set costumers Lucy Shapiro and Taylor Smith. But they hope audiences never see their work. In September 2022, Shapiro and Smith started Covvier, a “modesty garment” company. The name is a portmanteau of “cover” and “barrier” and the products, which cost around $60 …
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